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Public Lectures Print

‘At home’ has become a problematic term. Current mobility options and flexibility demands have led to new combinations of sedentariness and mobility, migration and living, which has changed the meaning of ‘being at home’. At the historic Bauhaus ‘the home’ was already subject of the design activities: Homes became agents training their inhabitants in a modern way of living characterised by industrialisation and technology. The cantilever chair illustrates paradigmatically the idea of a life on the go, and turns its back on the false cosiness of the bourgeois living room. For Modernism the home as such was suspect: Modernity’s belief in the fundamental rootlessness of humankind found its expression in a spartan domesticity. The disquiet at the Bauhaus dwellings stems from this tension between the topoi abode and being-on-the-move – a theme that continues to be relevant up to the present day.

The second international Summer School of the Bauhaus Dessau Foundation will look at new forms of translocal living. Dessau itself serves as a fitting example in two respects:
In the 1920s, the city was a showcase for innovative experiments in social housing. And today, it is not only affected by out-migration and shrinkage, but with new nationally and transnationally oriented institutions in town a mobile class has evolved which commutes from major cities such as Berlin and  Leipzig. As part of the Summer School, a public lecture series held at a number of local venues will reflect on the different facets of living put in motion in the modern era. International experts will look from different angles at the visions and designs put up for negotiation.

Sunday morning lecture marathon on 25th July 2010

10.30 am - ‘Practicing 'living at home' - on the situational character of living’ - Jürgen Hasse (Frankfurt/Main)
1 pm - ‘Not at home: Domesticity and Modernism’ - Penny Sparke (London)
3 pm - ‘Natural buildings and wild settlements’ -  Gerd Kuhn (Stuttgart)
5 pm - ‘Global dwelling cultures’ - Anthony D. King (London)